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Category Archives: Podcasts

Podcasts 4 Technology/PD/Education

Our Web 2.0 Part 2 Moodle course provided some wonderful discussion on useful technology and professional development podcasts. Why reinvent the wheel? Here are some of the resources (with descriptions) that were provided from teachers enrolled in the course. Use these as mini lessons, reviews, independent study pieces, or to clear up common misconceptions.

  • Ted Talks: This is a Must!!! (Video, Audio, A Taste of TedTalks)
  • Getting Tech into Edis a podcast about using more technology in education. It would be helpful for students by giving teachers more information about technology and exactly how to use it in their classrooms. I would use this for staff development to show teachers available technology and exactly they can use it, or how to spice up an assignment by using technology in a different way. (Also check out Ed Tech Weekly)
  • K12 Databases: is a group of  videos that talk about the advantages of using databases and where they are available. These are beneficial in getting students to understand a database’s value. I would use the videos to show students how much more reliable databases are compared to the open internet and how, by using them, they are creating a skill useful for lifetime.
  • The Stuff of Genius: I like these feeds because it allows the children to hear the unlikely or unthought of (at the time) and tracks the invention/buisness/idea into its being/invention.  It is interesting and motivational.  I think this can be used for motivation and creative thinking practices.
  • Today’s Middle Level Educator: This podcast will help keep me up to date on some of the current topics that frequently come up regarding middle school. Some different topics that are of interest are school uniforms, formative assessment, advisory, single sex classrooms and much more.  Keeping up with ideas/thoughts from others will help make my classroom and school a better place. (Also check out Middle School Matters)
  • CNN Student News: This would help my students keep up with current events.  It is a 10 minute (commercial free news) designed for middle/high school students.  It would be great to help students be more connected with what is going on in the World.  Instructionally, it could be used to start discussions, to projects, think of ways to help others etc.
  • NPR Driveway Moments: is part of the section of NPR called All Things Considered. This can be used as a critical thinking piece while still using listening skills. This will perhaps be used as a whole group activity where notetaking can take place before an actual discussion of the points presented. I’m excited. (Also check out Hearing Voices)
  • This Week In Education: would be a podcast for me. It shows how education was in the news. You can see a video of the news to find out details and what is the latest in education.
  • Teaching with the SMARTboard – I would use this to get ideas for smartboard lessons. My students love using technology, and I try to incorporate notebook lessons whenever possible.  This is a great source for new ideas! (Also check out Teachers Connecting)
  • The Teacher’s Podcast: I plan to view this podcast for my own professional development in technology!
  • TeenBiz: this is a podcast with a collection of small business ideas (podcast directory) that have teenagers in mind.  Most ideas require no or little start up money but can make $20-$30 an hour for the young hardworking entrepreneur.  For a student’s annual ARD meeting I often ask them to research careers and fields that they would be interested in working in in order to form their tranisition goal for their IEP.  This podcast is another great resource for students to get ideas on how to support themselves or supplement income.
  • iPad in business: this explains how major corporations are incorporating ipads in business.  We have recently recieved ipads in the classroom, by using information from this podcast it can give students ideas for their class work. (Also check out Execs Talk iPads & iPad How To’s)
  • Teachers 2.0: This podcast discusses technology and gives tips on how to integrate this into the curriculum. I will use this by adding technology where and when I can to my lessons. (Also check out Teachers 2.0)
  • Technology that Works: this will be beneficial for me by keeping by integrating technology and Marzano’s strategies. I will be able to integrate this into all aspects of my curriculum by stretching my students understanding with technology.
  • Teaching with the SMARTboard: There are so many uses for SmartBoard. Students love using it in class and it helps keep them engaged and on task. Because it is quite a complex piece of technology, continuing education on its use and features that work well for my lessons is essential if it to be maximized. Taking part in video podcasts to train me in new uses for SmartBoard is a critical component of my professional development. I am using this in Google reader.

Podcasting 101 for K-12 Librarians: this is not a podcast but provides some excellent information on podcasting & some great references. Also check out using iTunes as a Digital Portfolio.

Some of these podcasts can be subscribed to which will feed into iTunes, others can be saved as an audio or movie file and imported into iTunes, and some are even bundled as an app. Please post others you find in the comments section along with a description and/or how they can be used.

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Posted by on May 24, 2011 in iPad, Podcasts

 

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Podcasts 4 Fine Arts

Our Web 2.0 Part 2 Moodle course provided some wonderful discussion on useful Math podcasts. Why reinvent the wheel? Here are some of the resources (with descriptions) that were provided from teachers enrolled in the course. Use these as mini lessons, reviews, independent study pieces, or to clear up common misconceptions.

  • The Orff Site Show: This website will be useful to me in helping me find new lessons to incorporate Orff (a method of teaching music) into my classroom.  I am Orff level I certified and this will help me reinforce my skills before moving on to the next level of cedrtification.  The students will benefit from this site through the lessons I teach in the classroom using group work & individual work based on the lessons I learn from this site.
  • From the Top at Carnegie Hall: this program interviews and plays performances from young, talented musicians.  I will use this in assignments for my older children so that they can see the opportunities that exist for those who choose a career in music.  It will make music and musicians more relevant in their lives.
  • NPR Live Concerts & Radio Disney will both give me new listening examples, music for compare and contrast activities and for listening journals for grades 3-5. (also check out Disney on Broadway).

Some of these podcasts can be subscribed to which will feed into iTunes, others can be saved as an audio or movie file and imported into iTunes, and some are even bundled as an app. Please post others you find in the comments section along with a description and/or how they can be used.

 
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Posted by on May 23, 2011 in Fine Arts, iPad, Podcasts

 

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Podcasts 4 History

This is a great place to start: 10 Educational History Podcasts to Subscribe & Listen & All Known History Podcasts

(Check out History Podcast & PDF Guide for the 30 Year War)

Here are a few more that I came across over the weekend.

I now have a new saying, “There is a Podcast for That.”

 
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Posted by on May 23, 2011 in History, iPad, Podcasts

 

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Flipping the Classroom

I recently was asked to be part of a Think Tank to promote global education through the use of technology integration in our schools (many times highlighting the power of mobile devices & Web 2.0 tools). I have since then been inspired to share this video and its message with anyone and everyone that will lend me their ears.

As a Math teacher, I am familiar with the direct teach… assign guided/independent work in class… work not finished becomes homework… homework is not completed or completed inaccurately (and oftentimes with misconceptions) due to lack of instructional support at home. This cycle has gone on for much too long and is clearly still a practice as we see multiple interventions occurring to save students from failure on high stakes assessments and grade level promotion.

Though I was aware of the Kahn Academy app and am quite familiar with other Math apps that can be used to build math capacity and strengthen math skills, it was not till last week when the idea of “flipping the classroom” was added to my vernacular. How exquisitely simple the idea for such a powerful change to pedagogy and student results. Ask yourself, “How would our knowledge of Math or Science differ if Einstein & Newton had left detailed videos to explain their theories and concepts?” The entire video is linked below (it only takes 20 minutes to be inspired).

Let’s use video to reinvent education: Salman Khan on TED.com.

While this is not meant to be a one-size-fits-all approach, it does have many benefits for our learners:

  • allows learners who fall behind to not feel ashamed in asking for help as they can access the videos from home (rather than ask a question in front of the class)
  • allows self-directed and self-motivated learners to move ahead at a pace that is right for them
    • One example that was given during our meeting was that of a second grade student who had not qualified for the GT program but was extremely interested in what those students were doing in the program – especially with Math. The GT teacher directed him to her website with all of her teacher videos and assignments for the next few weeks. He quickly returned and wanted to know when she would be posting the next video, as he had not only completed the first video and assignment but all of them. Some times the walls of our classrooms are too small to contain the voracious appetite for learning and discovery that many of our students possess. She has since then began coaching him as a student in Khan Academy.
    • I too had a similar story. I taught a Pre-Algebra Advanced course for 7th grade students. While the students were predominantly GT, the levels and spectrum of GT varied throughout the classroom. One student always stood out to me. He would receive perfect scores on his assessments and he would actually read ahead to the next 2-3 chapters in the Math textbook. I recommended him to move to Algebra that year and he did well being two years ahead of his peers in Math. At the time we did not have access to or knowledge of the wealth of video and online resources available for a student of his caliber. Looking back, this would have been a wonderful gift to empart to all of my Math students.
  • allows students who missed class or have transferred from another campus, district, state to fill in the gaps (lessons & skills) that they may have missed
  • provides copious amounts of data (e.g. time spent on video or activity, problems missed, how many attempts, etc…) to teachers to track students and provide more resources and remediation of needed

Much of the Criticism I have seen against the Flipped Classroom highlights the lack of technology available to access the videos, inability and delay to ask questions, the idea that videos should not be the primary delivery method for all students, the necessity of additional resources to accompany lectures. While I do agree with many of the criticisms highlighted in this article, I believe there are ways to work around them:

  • It is true that not all students have internet access at home. However, many of them have mobile devices that will solve this issue. This may lead to a BYOT (Bring Your Own Technology) classroom concept as well. For those that do not, perhaps teachers and schools can agree to some sort of check out process for mobile devices.
  • It is true that while watching a video, you can not ask questions and have them answered. Even if students do write down their questions for the next day, they may be overwhelmed with how many questions that have. This is where social media and peer collaboration is key. First, most teachers will have a good idea where students will encounter an issue and they could supply additional resources to scaffold and supplement these topics and ideas. Also, peers are an excellent (and oftentimes underused) resource – especially if the teacher creates some form of online learning community (e.g. Edmodo, Moodle) for students to collaborate and support each other.
  • It is true that this should not be a one-size-fits-all approach nor the only instructional resource in the classroom. It is more the idea than the resource itself and it could be used as much or as often as an instructor sees fit. It is not intended to completely replace the role of the teacher or of good current instructional practices.
    • Some schools may call upon teachers who are strong orators and have a way with teaching a particular concepts to create videos of their lectures and disseminate them for other classes. Others may want to record student explanations as well. Both of these ideas can be easily accomplished using a document camera (the actual person delivering instruction would not even need to appear in the video – just the action of explaining the instruction or problem/examples).
    • Teachers should work together to create and supply resources to accompany videos. Resources could range from PPT’s, to interactive websites, to SMART lessons, to podcasts, to videocasts, to apps, to Khan Academy activities, to math-themed children’s books, to ePubs, to online learning communities. A veritable scmorgasbord of resources and support to meet the needs of any and all learners.
Though the focus on this blog is Math, the idea of reversing your classroom could be applied across the curriculum. How will you FLIP YOUR CLASSROOM?
 
 

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Podcasts 4 ELAR/Language/Library

Our Web 2.0 Part 2 Moodle course provided some wonderful discussion on useful Math podcasts. Why reinvent the wheel? Here are some of the resources (with descriptions) that were provided from teachers enrolled in the course. Use these as mini lessons, reviews, independent study pieces, or to clear up common misconceptions. 

  • Grammar Girl: This is a must!!!!
  • Storynory: This podcast has a bunch of poems and stories that are auditory. Many of my students sadly, don’t have books at home, this is a way they can get the exposure and enjoyment of literature just by clicking the link.When looking through the podcasts in Storynory, I saw that they had The Wizard of Oz, which is on my student’s reading list, broken down by chapter. The podcasts here are almost like an audio book. The chapters are each read aloud on the podcast. This would be a great way to keep students who are frequently absent caught up. I could post the podcast in my wiki for each chapter. Students could listen to the chapter if they are home sick
  • Sweet and Sassy Summer of girls fiction: This is a podcast for girls that has some storytelling activities geared towards girls, voiced by girls my students ages. It gives great ideas abot novels and literature that I can use to interest some of my girls especially over the summer, almost like a reading camp for them during the down time.
  • Book Voyages: This is a podcast dedicated to introduction of new books and poems geared towards kids my students age.  I am hoping to encourage them to listen to the podcast over the summer, by getting them to check it out in May, and using it regularly. (Also check out Horn Book Podcast & Authors Without Limits).
  • Coffee Break Spanish: This podcast will help me because I’m certified in Spanish, but I’m not currently teaching Spanish. So it can keep me up to date and practicing/reviewing the language daily.  I wouldn’t use it instructionally (at this moment), but could be used to connect with Spanish speaking students and parents. (Also check out Discover Spanish, Finally Learn Spanish)
  • English Grammar in Context:  will serve as that extra grammar practice, or perhaps the reteach that sometimes needs to take place.  Again, individual station work or as additional work at home.
  • One Voice from Africa: is a news program connecting Africa and America.  I will use it for listening practice as well as just current information.  I have several African students and this will provide some intrinsic motivation for learning as they have great interest in what is happening back home.
  • Meet the Author: is a podcast for the students. Students can listen to interviews of different authors to find out about what inspired them to start writing, hear about the characters in the books and learn facts about the author.
  • American English Pronunciation: is pronunciation practice and I will be using it for stations or as homework for my students.  It provides private practice and allows some flexible learning in my classroom.
  • Books on the Nightstand: is a blog about books, authors, and reviews of books. It is beneficial to both me and the student because it has suggestions for what to read next, books that are related to each other by theme or author, and information about authors. Instructionally, for me personally, I am always looking for fun interesting picture books to share with my family. For students, it would help them choose a book.
  • Radio WillowWeb: This podcast database is something that we’ve used in our previous assignments as an example for podcasting.  I struggled to find ideas for how to use podcasting with my first graders. This podcast subscription is great for me because it helps me get ideas for my own classroom and gives me a guide for formatting.  It works well for my students because it allows them to learn from other students and they can use it as a model of expectation for their own podcasts.  I used this for my students’ assignment.  We are about to study sound in the upcoming weeks and I found a podcast on Sound created by third graders for my students to listen to and record one thing they learned about. I thought it would be a great introduction.
  • Super Why! PBS Kids: this is a breakthrough preschool series designed to help kids ages 3 to 6 with the critical skills that they need to learn to read (and love to read!) SUPER WHY makes reading an empowering adventure by using interactive literacy games that need YOU to play. I think this resource will be great for my students, especially in the beginning of the year when many of them are still lacking the basic, fundamental reading and phonics skills.
  • Just Vocabulary: I am always looking for new ways to introduce new vocabulary to my students. This podcast presents two new words per episode. I would post one podcast per week. The students would have the week to listen to the podcast and complete activities through the week. One might consist of posting a complete sentence using each vocabulary word to the wiki.
  • Vocabulary and Oral Language Development: Vocabulary and language development are key in kindergarten. I will be able to use this site to engage learning in both areas.
  • Audiobooks with Annie: Classic books from the public domain. She is currently reading Anne of Green Gables. This could be used as a station or during SSR time. Would also lend itself to booktalks on my wiki!
  • Kinder PODS- kindergarten: This podcast has great information pertaining to kindergarten.  There are examples of student work, music, students reading, and much more.  I’d love to have my students listen to a recording of kindergartener read, for example, the Hermit Crab by Eric Carle, as part of our Eric Carle study.
  • Kinderkids: This is a podcast from a kindergarten class in New Hampshire. This subscription can give me ideas to use in my own classroom, as well as offer a great way to share what other kindergartners are doing in another state.  Having my students listen to their podcasts would not only be entertaining, but give my own students ideas for contributing to our own podcasts.
  • BigStoryTime: This podcast has lots of short stories for kiddos on varying topics.  There is a story called “I Love My Mommy” that I will have my students listen to before we start working on our Mother’s Day projects this week.  I’ll post the link to my blog and then have my students finish the sentence stem “I love my mommy because….”
  • Cody’s Cuentos: Has stories in Spanish to listen to online. This is exactly what I need in my dual language classroom which will help with developing better listening skills especially when their is a lack of bilingual material in our classroom.
  • Candlelight Stories: Listening to a variety of stories when books and/or parents or older siblings are not available to help them read, or read to the child. We can listen to a variety of stories through these podcasts, on all different types: fables/folk tales/fairy tales. This blended perfectly with our reading unit we just wrapped up in first grade.
  • The Reading Workshop: this podcast will be beneficial for me by keeping me connected to reading and good ways to implement this into my teaching and curriculum. I will use this by adding these strategies into my daily teaching.
  • How to Videos: are mini blogs about how to act in various situations. These are british, and so much fun. They are beneficial to students through role playing different social situations and showing exactly how to handle each. An example is “how to pay a compliment” and “how to decline an invitation.” I would have these available to students on the Library Resource page under the heading “Handling Yourself in Society.” These would also be great for adults. (also check out Elementary Podcast & Big City Small World & I Want to Talk About)
  • Modern Manners Guy: This is a fun podcast. Some of the podcasts are more directed for high school/adults so I would have to find which ones apply to the middle school level.  I teach social skills (all of my students happen to be male) and many have autism so this would be a fun way to teach them manners and social skills. (also check out Manners for the Digital Age)

Also check out Sesame Street Podcast (video episodes where muppets & celebrity guests explaining the meaning of words), Children’s Fun Storytime Podcast, 123 Listen 2 Me (review books, movies,and music), Graphic Organizer Tools, Bookwink, Children’s Fun Storytime, The Lost World, A Tale of Two Cities, Alice in WonderlandThe Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson, B&N Meet the Writers, The Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf, ESL Library & English as a Second Language, Prometheus Radio Theater, Recess Stories: A Web Series for Kids, and Librivox: Great Big Treasury of Beatrix Potter.

Also check out the Escondido iRead Program (iRead in iTunes) for information on how podcasts and vodcasts can be used to support and improve the reading process. iPod, iListen, iRead is another great article to support the success of iPods and reading skills.

Many of these podcasts listed can be used as a stand alone or as an example/inspiration for student and/or teacher podcast production.

Some of these podcasts can be subscribed to which will feed into iTunes, others can be saved as an audio or movie file and imported into iTunes, and some are even bundled as an app. Please post others you find in the comments section along with a description and/or how they can be used.

 
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Posted by on May 19, 2011 in ELAR, iPad, Podcasts

 

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Podcasts 4 Science

Our Web 2.0 Part 2 Moodle course provided some wonderful discussion on useful Science podcasts. Why reinvent the wheel? Here are some of the resources (with descriptions) that were provided from teachers enrolled in the course. Use these as mini lessons, reviews, independent study pieces, or to clear up common misconceptions.

  1. Absolutely Wild Visuals (Animal Olympians): Showcases some of the library’s most compelling wildlife footage. These mini documentaries highlight wildlife hunting for food and show how their survival depends on their physical prowess. I thought this would be a great resource for the students during our animal unit in science.
  2. Whale Trackers: Is a series of documentary programs that journey across the world’s oceans to explore the lives of whales, dolphins, and porpoises. It explores their range of species and diverse habitats and examines the threats the animals face. My students are currently working on an “All-About” Books Project and one group is writing about whales. I thought this would be an excellent resource for them to use and could also be used during our animal unit.
  3. Science in the Real World: Though I am not a science teacher, I would love to share this podcast with the science teacher on my team. It breaks down specific topics in science. My team generally builds our integrated projects around a science lesson. As a team, we could use these podcasts for integrated projects if there is a topic that coincides with what students are learning.
  4. Creepy Creatures of Texas: Students will find this podcast very interesting to see so many bats escaping. Instructionally, they will see characteristics and habits of animals
  5. Sid the Science Guy: Is a show form PBS that focuses on science concepts for Kindergarten age children. My students will enjoy it very much and it will help reinforce our science concepts in a fun motivating way. (Also Check out Volume 2).
  6. DragonflyTV: Students can listen to these podcasts about real-life SCIENCE experiments by kids! I love that this is produced by PBS Kids. There are TONS to choose from – I can’t wait to utilize this in my classroom. How could you not use this instructionally?! My kids would love to watch these science experiments – either to supplement our own science experiments with, or to lengthen and add to our existing experiments. This is an AWESOME resource for me!
  7. Kids’ Science Challenge: This will benefit my students. They have cool experiments and different things about science. These experiments are easy to reproduce and get the kids involved. This can be worked into the classroom as a Science center for the kids to get involved.

Also check out The Science Show for Kids, Douchy’s Biology, EcoGeeks, Meagher’s classes: Chemistry & Physics, Physics: 50 Examples, and Physics in Action.

Health/Wellness
  1. PE Talk: This podcast gives an array of discussion topics concerning Physical Education class. Both teachers and students can gain knowlege through podcasts such as “Skill progression”. Teachers can gain ideas on how to teach certain skills just as students can practice their skills at home in a one on one situation. Different assignments can be created for students to either physcially or with pen and paper identify warm up activities, skills, movements, etc.
  2. Essential Fitness with Wess Murray: Wess Murray is a personal trainer/wellness coach. His ideas on weight loss, nutrition, training, and performance can supplement the content that is taught in the classroom. Teachers can use his motivational approach as a “different voice” than the one students always hear. Sometimes this “different voice” in what students need to jump starts students towards a physically fit life.

Some of these podcasts can be subscribed to which will feed into iTunes, others can be saved as an audio or movie file and imported into iTunes, and some are even bundled as an app. Please post others you find in the comments section along with a description and/or how they can be used.


 
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Posted by on May 19, 2011 in iPad, Podcasts, Science

 

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Podcasts 4 Math

Our Web 2.0 Part 2 Moodle course provided some wonderful discussion on useful Math podcasts. Why reinvent the wheel? Here are some of the resources (with descriptions) that were provided from teachers enrolled in the course. Use these as mini lessons, reviews, independent study pieces, or to clear up common misconceptions.

  • The Video Math Tutor–  Even during summer kids can access podcasts to see how some of the math they will be doing in summer is done, it serves as a good review and resource. Tips on how to solve algebra problems, gives graphing calculator tips, brian teasers, and other tips for both students and teacher.
  • Edutopia (Math)– I like this feed because it is a good resource for teachers when they need new ideas or a new insight to approaches or thoughts on teaching. “Teaching Elementary Students the Magic of Math” really shows how math can and should be integrated fully into all subjects of learning.
  • The Wizard of Oz- From Fractions to Formulas – I love to show that math is not scary.  When information is presented to the students in a familiar or entertaining method it grabs the kids attention and diminishes fear of a subject.
  • Math Guy podcast – Fun math games and trick. Gets kids excited about math and using numbers
  • Mathtrain.TV – Review over middle school concepts, interest, percent of a number, unit cost.
  • Khan Academy – Geometry: Khan Academy has podcasts in all of the subject areas in mathematics. It gives very detailed and drawn out explanations of various mathematics topics, including geometry. It is an excellent podcast for students who struggle with their work or for those who would like to see more examples outside of class.
  • Mr. A’s Geometry Podcast: This podcast is similar to the Khan Academy podcast. Detailed explanations of various geometry topics are shown, but more closely resembles what a student would
  • Math Mutation: This podcast provides weekly topics in mathematics that are described as “fun, interesting and weird corners of math.” It can be used to show students than math can be fun and interesting.
  • Math by Design: “These videos and support materials will give you another weapon in your answer arsenal. In the videos, students meet people whose everyday, real life includes just the kind of mathematics they explore in Math by Design. Use the Discussion Questions and Related Practice resources to extend and enrich your students’ video watching experience!”
  • Media 4 Math: Videos range from algebra applications in the mortgage crisis to exploring 3D Geometry. Also has a great section on Math in the News with PPT presentations to accompany.
  • Is All About Math: Math is a subject area that is ever changing. Even though the concepts remain consistent, the strategies and techniques for presenting those concepts are anything but consistent. Using this video podcast as a resource to stay current and on trend is vital in giving my students the advantage they need to be successful beyond my classroom. I am using this in Google reader.
  • The Math Dude (Algebra 1): This is a wonderful tool for my geometry students who need to brush up on algebra and to fill in any gaps that they may experience from their previous year. This was found in iTunes as a video podcast. I like that my students can access this when they need reinforcement on a concept or just another way to look at an area that may be particularly problematic for them. This could also be used as a mini lesson to fill in weak areas in important concepts.
  • Precalculus – Fenton: I found this video podcast in iTunes. This would be a great tool for students who are absent from class. It would also give me ideas when I am looking for ways to present particular lessons. Students can use it as a review or to obtain a different perspective. One drawback is that it took a long time to download.

Also Check out: MathsMaster.org,, Math Snacks& MathtrainTV.

Some of these podcasts can be subscribed to which will feed into iTunes, others can be saved as an audio or movie file and imported into iTunes, and some are even bundled as an app. Please post others you find in the comments section along with a description and/or how they can be used.
 
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Posted by on May 17, 2011 in iPad, Math, Podcasts

 

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