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Today’s Meet

Todays Meet is a Web 2.0 tool that is free, requires no logins, and works off of any iDevice. It allows teachers to instantly create a virtual room for students to speak up. The tool can be used for discussions, brainstorming, preflecting, formative assessment, and even exit tickets. Responses are limited to 140 characters or less (much like Twitter). This type of online response is considered micro-blogging due to the size of the post.

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Other Ideas for Todays Meet:

  • Pop-Up Discussion: Try spicing up an educational video clip by creating a Today’s Meet virtual room via mobile devices. Students could post questions and answers to the film as they go or could even highlight character traits, discover elements of light and dark imagery, discuss misconceptions and vocabulary, analyze quotes, practice Socratic questioning, summarize, or locate Shakespearean references (see Raise the Curtain & Raise the Bar post) – almost like a virtual dialectical notebook. VH1 used to do something similar with Pop-Up Videos and many television shows (the Voice which claims to be the “most digitally integrated show on television”) will run Twitter feeds at the bottom of the screen. Not only is this form of media engaging – it is a great way to track comprehension and to have an ongoing discussion.
  • Evaluate Posts: Todays Meet also allows you to print a transcript of the discussion which is wonderful for counting and evaluating posts. I even had a teacher print it out, black out the names, and use it for a starter the next day. Students were asked to evaluate the spelling and grammar in the posts. What a great extension!

Things to be mindful of:

  • Public Access: Because there are no logins, anyone with the url can access and contribute to the group (which could be good if you wanted to chat with another class in another district, city, around the world, etc… but not so good for other obvious reasons. This is why I typically only leave the room open for two hours.). 
  • Student Info protection: it may be wise to have students use names that are generic or give them a # to avoid having student information made publicly accessible.
  • Inappropriate Comments: There is no way to remove or delete the comment from the feed. This may worry some teachers but I liken it to a student blurting out an inappropriate comment in the classroom. There would be no way to delete this comment from the minds or ears of his/her fellow classmates either. I would handle this incident similarly to how a teacher would handle the student who blurted out in class.
  • Setting Ground Rules: Ground rules should be taught prior to conducting a Todays Meet discussion. Students should be give a purpose for the discussion and instructed to stay on topic, be respectful, and post quality not quantity. If you want your students to raise the discussion level, these guidelines should be set and reiterated prior to initiating the discussion.

Do not let these issues deter you from using the tool in your classroom. Just be vigilant and have a plan in place for tackling these issues if and when they arise. While the site is publicly accessible, I have had no issue with inappropriate use to this date.

Using Todays Meet with an iDevice: using Todays Meet in conjunction with a mobile device virtually eliminates many of the limitation issues of the tool in that the devices can be used in the classroom, lab, or an auditorium, and they provide more of a 1:1 solution. If using Todays Meet on an iDevice, the easiest way to approach this is to create a web clip to the Todays Meet site on each device and then have students launch the web clip and simply type in the name of the room after the url. This way if the room changes every two hours, students aren’t redirected to other rooms and the web clip will work all year in any classroom.

Check out this video from LearnitN5 for a quick tutorial and explanation

Check out some articles which reference how it is used in the classroom:

Interested in Web 2.0 tools for discussion? Check out Edmodo, Edistorm (this one is phenomenal – check out this video), LinoIt (works on iDevices), and Corkboard.me.
Below is a screenshot of the Todays Meet handout for the site and some supporting resources

 

 

Check out some of the responses from our Appy Hour via Today’s Meet!

 

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Posted by on June 3, 2011 in ELAR, iPad, Web 2.0

 

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HOT APPS for HOTS: Tour of Apps

Our Hot Apps for HOTS course is in its final stages of development. In an effort to create an agenda that is not traditional and stuffy, I have highlighted the apps we will cover using one of our HOT APPS for HOTS: Popplet Lite (check out the rest of the HOT Apps for HOTS entries for more detailed lessons and activities). Little Bird Tales and Todays Meet are actually Web 2.0 tools (thus they are indented a bit in the “agenda” to differentiate them from the apps). I included Todays’ Meet to highlight a Web 2.0 tool that works with the iPad to create an instant chat and gain valuable formative feedback from students. While Little Bird Tales does not work with the iPad (flash issues – although they are testing a version that will allow you to export your tale as a mp4 which will work nicely with iTunes), it is a great way to show that not all information and resources must be housed on the iPad.

The wonderful thing about these tools is that they can be used individually or be paired with each other (see Little Bird Tales: Signs of Math lesson for a sampling of this pairing.)

©2011. Lisa Johnson. All rights reserved. Permission to reproduce for classroom use granted.

Below, I have included two of the lessons from a guest chef, Terri Sanchez.

TerriSanchezLessons: tsanch@neisd.net

Popplet Lite: Activity guides students to use Popplet Lite to map nouns (common, proper,singular, plural, and possessive). Popplet Lite-1 (PDF Lesson). Other uses are listed and highlighted as extensions in the Signs of Math lesson.

iBrainstorm: Activity guides students to use iBrainstorm to pre-write/brainstorm for a persuasive essay. iBrainstorm (PDF Lesson). In using iBrainstorm, we encountered one minor glitch: when students try to write with a pen, the dotting the i and crossing the t is read as a double-tap and initiates a new sticky note. To avoid this issue, we recommended using the sticky notes for text and the pen tools only for basic annotations.)

If you like Popplet & iBrainstorm, check out the paid app Corkulous for more functionality.

Check out Jon Baldoni’s article on “Using Stories to Persuade” and consider having students use Puppet Pals in conjunction with Mind-Mapping apps to create a persuasive story.

The rest of the lessons have been cooked up in house by yours truly: Puppet Pals, iCardSort, “Signs of Math”: Bump & Contacts

While these apptivities were not specifically categorized according to Bloom’s Taxonomy, they all involve creating & analyzing. Check out these sites that http://ilearntechnology.com/ has compiled according to the levels of Bloom:

Bloom's Taxonomy of Apps

Also Check out Kathy Schrock’s Bloom’s Taxonomy of Google Apps. Consider using these in conjunction with your iPad apptivities.
 
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Posted by on May 27, 2011 in HOT APPS for HOTS, iPad

 

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